In the Arms of Faithful God

In the Arms of Faithful God

Tamika R

Tamika R

I was born in Denver, Colorado. I moved to OKC after quitting my jobs as a teacher and YouthIntern to pursue the call into ministry. I started as a non traditional student at Oklahoma where I met my husband. He was a non traditional student working on a 2nd degree after moving from Poland to pursue a degree in Ministry. We dreamed together of serving the Lord in Europe. Now we are blessed to be witness to the awesome way that God works all over the world. We live in Vienna, Austria with our3 kids. We work with Eastern European Mission. We provide Bibles and ethics materials in native languages of Eastern Europe. That means we get to seeGod's hand and providence all over Europe. I am Publishing Assistant at EEM and a fitness trainer. I fill my days caring for my family, teaching gym classes and designing book covers and working on details to provide quality materials to those who need God's word. In my free time I paint, cook, make jewelry and run 2 blogs.
Tamika R

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It was February. I was about seven weeks pregnant for the second time. As I prepared to leave for the Bible class I was teaching, I knew something was wrong. I ran to the bathroom and I was bleeding. I took several deep breaths, said many prayers, and rushed off to the church.

The next day I went to the doctor. They confirmed there was a problem, told me to rest, and take testosterone for a few week. I did. At the next checkup, they told us the heartbeat was gone.

I was devastated. The doctor instructed me to go home and wait to miscarry. After it happened, I was to call and let them know.

Seven weeks passed and my belly continued to get bigger. So did my hope.

I decided there was some medical mistake. They were wrong. Clearly, my baby was growing. About this time, I started to get sick. I had never had morning sickness this strong and I figured this was just a part of it.

My doctor called to follow up since I never called. She asked me to come in. They looked and said I had a missed miscarriage. The baby was gone but my body wouldn’t let it go. I had to come back the next day to surgically end it.

When the surgery was over, I woke up deeply saddened by the loss of our child, but physically feeling great. Two weeks later I had follow-up tests. Within days, my doctor called my house. I remember thinking how nice she was to call me. She said,

“I took the liberty of running some extra tests after your surgery to try and figure out what happened, and again at the follow-up. Now that all the results are back, I need you to go tomorrow to meet with this doctor. He is a specialist. He can help you, and they will explain it.”

She added:

“If you were my sister I would ask you to see my friend at OU Medical Center. I have taken the liberty of making you an appointment.”

After agreeing to the appointment I hung up the phone, rolled into a ball on the bed, and cried. I was hurting for the lost dreams. Secretly, I had named the baby Noah. It hurt to think of all the things he would never experience or become. Even though I only knew he existed for fifteen weeks, he was mine and I loved him.

I called my dad and just sat on the phone with him and cried. My own strong attachment to the baby I lost puzzled me. Grief is a funny thing, but somehow just knowing my dad was listening on the other end comforted me.

Not many people knew I was pregnant because the pregnancy was troubled so early. So I tried to handle my emotions in secret.

Now, there was something about losing him that required me to go to a specialist because my doctor didn’t feel she could explain it? How much more could I take? I called my husband and he made plans to go with me to the appointment.

It didn’t take long to figure out what was coming once we got to the specialist’s office at OU Medical Center. He was in the department of oncology. They asked me to fill out a thirteen page registration form. Most of it had to do with cancer. I just lost a baby. So why were they asking me so many questions that did not apply to my situation?

They called us in, and we met with a team of doctors who explained that I had a rare form of cancer. It prevented the proper development of the pregnancy. In our case it was really rare because I had both tumors and a pregnancy. I would begin chemo the following day.

miscarriage, cancer, pain, sadness, faithful God, hope, renewalWe were in shock. I had to slam the brakes and shift gears. Though they assured me the cancer was very curable and that I would only need chemo for about three weeks, I was scared.

My thoughts turned to getting through this and focusing on maintaining my life and surviving for the sake of my two year old. Also we were planing to move onto the mission field so I needed to keep it all together.

I suppose now, as I am crying while sharing my story, I probably never fully mourned the loss. It happened as a mixture of the fear of the unknown loomed over me. The reality that no matter what happened next I would never go back to a life that didn’t include cancer.

The next day I gathered up all of my courage. As we walked out of the elevator at the hospital, I said goodbye to all that could have been. I needed all of my energy to focus on hope and move forward to create a new definition of what could be.

As it turned out, three weeks turned into eight months. Countless doctors, four different kinds of treatments, a clinical trial, several scares, constant bleeding, tumor growing, and countless nights stretched out on the floor crying out to the Lord.

While my situation took twists and turns like a roller coaster, God remained at my side and gave me strength. Many things in my life fell apart during that time. I changed, and lost parts of myself that have still not returned.

God is faithful, and he gave me a peace I still can’t understand to this day.  Even if I was asked to, I couldn’t explain it.

In some ways I still hurt, and I don’t expect that to change. I still think about what could have been. What would that baby would have been like? They told us chemo was the only way we might be able to preserve my ability to have more kids. But they could not make any promises.

God knew my heart’s desires, and four years later, shortly after moving onto the mission field of Vienna (not Poland as originally planned), I became pregnant with a baby boy. He was born strong and healthy here in Vienna. When he was about eighteen months old, I discovered I was nine weeks pregnant with another baby. My youngest was born here in Vienna as well.

God is faithful. He heard my prayers and answered in his own timing.

I know that he is near to the brokenhearted because he was near to me. I carried most of my pain in secret during that time for various reasons.

During this time, I learned to lean on God alone. I learned what it meant to be in the arms of faithful God as my world fell apart again and again.

If you have gone through the loss of a child, and all that goes along with it I am sure you can relate. If you have survived cancer, I know you know his providence. I pray you experienced his peace as well.

If you are in either of those places now, I am here. Feel free to message me or comment below. I will gladly pray and stand alongside you. Never forget God is faithful, able, and good. He wants that for us. He longs to give us hope and abundant life. Snuggle into his arms and let him pour the peace that is beyond human explanation into your soul. Know you are his treasured creation and he will not abandon you.

Be encouraged by these posts as well!

Crying it out MiscarriageSpiritual Walk Praying the Psalms

Writing for Healing

Writing for Healing

Toni D

Toni D

Toni was born and raised in a small town in Oklahoma.She graduated from East Central University with a Bachelor's of Science Degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Economics.After college, she returned to her hometown to marry her best friend, Charles.Toni is a stay at home mom to their three teens, two boys and a girl, whom God led them to homeschool.Her goal is to raise her children to love and serve the Lord.They live on a farm where they grow produce to sell at several farmers markets.She also plays the piano at church and teaches piano.
Toni D

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Believe it or not, I’m not an avid writer.

I did not enjoy writing in college and never thought I would do it in my spare time.

A few years ago, my opinion of writing changed.  I had lost my grandfather for whom I had been a primary caregiver for several years.  At the time, this was the most difficult thing I had ever experienced because I had not dealt with prior grief.  If one does not deal with grief when it occurs, it continues to build and just gets worse.

Healing through Writing

While I was attending a grief support group, the facilitator, a wonderful Christian woman, suggested that I write my feelings in letter form to those who had caused me pain and anger, including my grandfather.  I was not to mail these letters, just to write them.  I thought this woman was crazy.  What good was it to write a letter? How would I find healing from my grief through a letter?

After being told this several times, I decided to try it.  Nothing was helping me cope and I knew my emotions were building.  One day, I sat down with a notebook and pen and started to write, and the words just poured out.  I wrote with such intensity and fury.  I didn’t know where it was all coming from.  In twenty minutes, I wrote eight pages to three people.  The emotional release I felt was unbelievable.  Everything came out.  It really did work!

Since that day, I continue to use this method for other issues in my life.  I often go back and add Bible verses in the margins when applicable.  I have even written letters to God.  This is my new-found therapy.  Pen and paper are a lot cheaper than a therapist!

If you are afraid of someone reading the letter, you can burn or shred it when you are finished.  I found that to be another healing aspect.  It symbolizes letting go.

Releasing Our Anger and Emotions

Remember, anger hurts us.  It separates us from God.  Satan is always trying to find ways to destroy us.  Ephesians 4:26-27 says,

“Be angry, and yet do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and do not give the devil an opportunity.”

We need to let our emotions out, not bottle them up.

Do you have an issue you can’t let go?

Prayer for Moms Across the World

Prayer for Moms Across the World

Lori S

Lori S

I'm Lori! My husband and I have been married since 2008. We adopted our son in July and live in Memphis, TN. One of the things I love about Creating a Great Day is that it is focused on inspiring women to the woman that God wants them to be. Every woman is different, and we all have talents to honor God and walk alongside each other in this spiritual journey called life. Have a blessed day!
Lori S

My husband and I adopted our son almost two years ago. Ever since we decided to adopt, I have had a wide range of emotions on Mother’s Day. Knowing that I will always share that day with my son’s biological mother encourages me to think of other women who may experience grief and joy on this day. This reflection helps focus my thoughts and prayers during this time. Join me in honoring these women in our thoughts and prayers this week!

A prayer for moms everywhere

Dear God, we come before your throne today, asking for your intercession in the lives of women across the world. We pray for…

  • the women who become moms today. Guide their hearts, minds, and emotions as they experience motherhood for the first time.
  • the moms who have lost children. Bring them the peace that comes only from you.
  • the mothers who work outside (or from) the home to provide for their children. Whether they work one (or three) jobs, help their work and sacrifice to be appreciated and noticed.
  • the moms who stay home with their children. Help them feel loved and appreciated by their children and spouses.

Father, we also pray for the moms who…

  • have chosen to place their children into adoptive families. Give them the peace and clarity they need in their lives. Help those around them celebrate their choice for life, but allow those moms an emotional space to grieve.
  • live in poverty. Help give them the emotional, spiritual, and financial supports they need to lead their family toward you.
  • are raising their children on their own. Remind their neighborhood or church communities to rally around them so those moms never feel alone.
  • became mothers through adoption. Bless their motherhood journey and give them the strength and clarity needed to raise their children in a new family.
  • became moms through foster care. Give them courage to fight for what they know is right and the ability to love even when it hurts.

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We pray for…

  • the moms who protect their children from violence, war, and abuse. Let them know that there is still light even in darkness.
  • the women who have lost their own moms. Encourage us to surround these women with love. Help us give them the space they need to celebrate and grieve simultaneously.
  • the women who suffer from depression, anxiety, or mental illness. Put people in their lives to encourage them and help them get the support they need.

And we lift up these women as well…

  • the moms who love their children but not their spouses. Help them realize that one of the best ways to show love to their children is to love their spouse.
  • the moms who are struggling in their relationships with their children. Let them know that you are with them. Always.
  • the women who are “mother figures” in the lives of children in our homes and communities. Equip those women to engage, mentor, and love children.

We ask you to cover these moms (and others) with your love, peace, and mercy. May we never forget the importance of what the word “mom” means. In Jesus’ name, Amen

 

Be encouraged by these posts as well!

Six Tip to Prepare for a Mission Trip Praying the Psalms We all struggle  A Mother to More than Your Own

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prayers-for-moms-across-the-world-social
The Hope in the Easter Story

The Hope in the Easter Story

Kristin J

Kristin J

I am a happy wife and mother to my amazing husband and beautiful little girl and we are living the good life just outside of Oklahoma City. I was born and raised in Houston, Texas where both of my parents serve as ministers. With God’s great guidance, I ended up earning a degree in children’s ministry from Oklahoma Christian University! I am an extrovert and love to make friends and have deep conversations. My days are filled with the duties of motherhood and homemaking but when I find a moment to myself I enjoy reading cookbooks, blogs, and Karen Kingsbury’s books. I have a slight addiction to facebook and pinterest. Holidays are my favorite days. I love to cook meals that make people happy. I have a passion for family ministry and bible class teaching. Most importantly, my greatest desire to is to know my heavenly Father more each day.
Kristin J

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The Easter Story is one of the grandest stories ever told.

Jesus hung on a cross to die an agonizing death which he did not deserve. Three days after his burial the ground shook and his grave was left empty. Jesus Christ had risen from the dead! He came to his disciples over the course of forty days to speak about the kingdom of God, and he lavished them with grace and promises to give them hope for the future. I love the glimpse Paul gives us in John 21:25:

Jesus did many other things as well. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written.

It’s like a really good series that you never want to end. Maybe if the internet had been around in those days Paul would have found some people to start writing about those “many other things” Jesus did during that time. Surely with the internet, we’d have room!!

Eventually the disciples ran out of time with Jesus on earth, and they watched their friend, teacher, and Lord rise into the clouds.

They clung to hope that Christ would return (as he promised he would) and they devoted the rest of their lives to building His church.

john-21-25

It is a story of hope.

Hope is a wonderful thing, but it’s also a very hard thing. The people who were closest to Jesus had just experienced a whirlwind of emotions. They mourned his death, rejoiced in his rising, and then had to bid him farewell again. It could not have been easy to leave company yet again with this man they loved so much. But they had hope. Hope in his return. This hope filled them with joy. Joy that glorified God and gave birth to generations upon generations of believers.

Each year I pick a word to focus on. This year, I had a difficult time choosing a word because I kept hearing God whisper “hope” but I didn’t want that word! I didn’t want to find myself in a situation needing hope. (Which is silly because we all need hope!) Reluctantly, I gave in and declared “hope” to be my word for 2016. Lo and behold, a couple of days later I found myself in a situation requiring hope. God is ever so merciful! He has showed me so much about hope in just a short few weeks.

So what does that mean and how does that relate to the resurrection story?

When troubling times come our way we can place our hope in many things. Mostly, I think it’s natural to put our hopes in our desired outcomes. We pray for these things in the hopes that God will give them to us. There is nothing wrong with those prayers either! Philippians 4:6 declares,

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

But is your hope in your desired outcome or in God?

Two lines from two favorite worship songs come to mind:

My hope is in you Lord, all the day long.

My hope is built on nothing less than Jesus’ blood and righteousness.

What does it really mean to have our hope solely in Jesus?

When the disciples faced hardships while spreading the gospel, I’m sure they desired relief but their hope remained in Christ and his second coming. They knew there was a bigger picture than what they were going through.

As I face my current struggle, I’ve been able to stay pretty peaceful (not that I’m always glad about my circumstance, because I’m not) but I know that there is a bigger picture than what me and my family are going through.

This picture is the life of Christ! The Easter story!!

God won when sin wanted to overcome and God invited ME to claim his victory. My hope in that promise is what gets me through my trials. It doesn’t matter if it’s a small problem or something completely life changing, I know that I take part in God’s victory and that ultimately I will see Christ one day.

No matter what struggles I come upon in this life, I’ve already overcome the bigger and more important picture!! Are you with me? Do you understand this truth tucked inside the writings of the gospel?

He said to them, “Go unto all the world and preach the good news to all creation. Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, whoever does not believe will be condemned.

Mark 16:15

Let me tell you, I believe!!! I believe that Jesus is who he says he is. With that confession I was baptized, and I claim my salvation that he offered to me. I claim God’s victory over sin and death.

The Easter story is about hope.

Hope in his promise that we can overcome through Him. Hope that when we claim God’s victory over sin as our own, no trial on this earth can defeat us.

Wherever you are in your life this Easter, may you take hope in this glorious promise.

Beauty in Dying

Beauty in Dying

Meredith P

Meredith P

Hello, there!  I grew up as a military kid who loved adventure, so I fell in love with and married a military man right after college graduation.  The two of us had adventures together as we traveled for a while, but we finally settled in cozy Southern Indiana.  However the excitement is still alive, because God has given us four kiddos that I homeschool.  I love nerding out on anything from school curriculum to thrift store bargain hunting, from rockin' recipes to theological debates, and pretty much any lively discussion in between.  Thanks for reading!
Meredith P

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Fall is beautiful.

The colors in the leaves are breathtaking. Check out this picture my mother-in-law took of a tree glowing with color:

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That tree is stunning, golden and vibrant.

The leaves on the ground around the tree reflect like a mirror the beauty on the branches.

I’d love to be next to that tree and sit under its calm beauty.

As I admire the vibrance of these fall colors a thought occurs to me:

Those leaves are beautiful because they are dying. 

Those leaves are not producing food for themselves anymore. In their death they blaze bright before falling to the ground. In that moment, a question occurs to me: Is there beauty in dying?

Yes, I do believe there is beauty in dying. As I think about it three thoughts come to me.

I believe there is beauty in dying to yourself in the everyday choices.

If two (or more) of my boys are arguing and no compromise can be made I say to them, “Well, one of you must die to yourself and desires then.” This idea comes from many Bible verses such as this one: “Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.” (Galatians 5:24, NIV)  It is beautiful to see one brother choose to put aside his own passions and desires for the love of his brother and for the love of Christ.

There is beauty in a mother who is weary with chores but chooses to roll up her sleeves anyway and find something to be thankful about. Beauty in a husband choosing to roll up his sleeves and do chores right next to her.

There is great loveliness in choosing patience and love toward someone who is rude to you. Loveliness in choosing to cry out to God to help you truly forgive someone who has wronged you.

There is something lovely in choosing to not watch a popular movie because the Lord’s name is profaned and the story has inappropriate sexual content in it. Beauty in a wife choosing to say ‘yes’ to her husband even when tired. And beauty in a husband choosing to be patient and wait on his wife to be ready.

There is beauty in a father choosing to ride bikes with excited children after a long day’s work. Loveliness in a mom choosing to share her last bite of chocolate with small pleading eyes.

Beauty in choosing to get out the checkbook, an envelope, and a stamp to send off $25 to the mission asking for financial help as they reach people for Christ.

There is beauty in dying to yourself in everyday choices.

I believe there is beauty in a Christian’s death. 

Often, at the passing of a loved one people will say, “I am sorry for your loss.” It is true there is loss in death, but for the death of a Christian the loss is temporary and beauty abounds. I have a dear friend who lost her sister this past May. This woman was in her early thirties and leaves behind on earth a husband, two very young daughters, adoring parents, and loving siblings. To be sure, there is a painful and searing loss. But, oh, there is beauty too.

The Bible says, “To live is Christ and to die is gain.” (Philippians 1:21) This mother, wife, daughter, sister has died, but because of her choice to follow Christ she has gained.

That is beautiful.

Her seeing her Savior face to face is incomprehensible in its beauty.

Her legacy of love and consistency in putting aside her own passions and desires is glowing in loveliness.

Her freedom from cancer and being given a new body by Christ is stunning.

And the promise of her reunion with her husband, daughters, parents, siblings, and friends for eternity is breathtaking.

If you have lost someone and they were in Christ, you have not truly lost them. You know where they are. They are saved for you in the most unfathomable place of beauty.

I believe there is beauty in a Christian’s death.

I believe none of this beauty would be possible without my Savior Jesus’s death. 

There would be no reason for a person to choose to “deny himself, and take up his cross daily and follow Me.” (Luke 9:23) if Jesus had not done it first so beautifully.

There is immeasurable beauty in Jesus’s life’s example where He, without fail, denied himself and died to His own passions and desires. When He, surrounded with sick and begging people all the time, chose the beauty in giving of Himself and thinking of others first. Beautiful.

There is inescapable beauty when He said, “yet not my will, but yours be done” (Luke 22:42) and chose death on a cross so that we might never be lost. So that we might never feel unloved. So that we would never have to say goodbye to anyone who is in Christ but only ‘see you later.’ Beautiful.

There is indescribable beauty in His rising again to live and to rule on the third day.  “Where, O death, is your victory? Where, O death, is your sting?” (1 Corinthians 15:55Breathtaking.

There is now beauty in dying. Jesus is the reason for it all.

So friends, feel free to die.

There is little that is more beautiful. Feel free to deny yourself and live for Christ and others. Find joy in being “a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God for this is your true and proper worship.” (Romans 12:1) It is your proper worship to the One who did it first. If you earnestly seek His help, He will show you. He knows the way.

May we, by God’s power in us, be like the tree above.

Beautiful in dying. Stunning, golden, and vibrant in sacrificial love.

May our actions leave a beauty around us that reflects like a mirror the loving beauty Christ has put in our hearts.

May we be people the world looks to for the calm in our hearts because we know death in the body is the beginning of eternal beauty.

An Annual Reminder to Find Beauty in Dying

Has this shed some new light on fall foliage for you? I know it will be an annual reminder for me from now on. Would you share how you see beauty in dying, or how you want to have more beauty in your life by denying yourself?

Thanks for reading.

*A note from the woman’s sister mentioned above: “By my sister living out her faith until the very moment Our Father called her home, she taught us how to choose joy in life and how to face death with such courage and hope. What a gift.”  Beautiful.

My Precious Baby: The Grief of Miscarriage

My Precious Baby: The Grief of Miscarriage

Toni D

Toni D

Toni was born and raised in a small town in Oklahoma.She graduated from East Central University with a Bachelor's of Science Degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Economics.After college, she returned to her hometown to marry her best friend, Charles.Toni is a stay at home mom to their three teens, two boys and a girl, whom God led them to homeschool.Her goal is to raise her children to love and serve the Lord.They live on a farm where they grow produce to sell at several farmers markets.She also plays the piano at church and teaches piano.
Toni D

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Seems Like Yesterday

It was the day before Thanksgiving 1996 but it seems like yesterday.  After two years of fertility treatments, we finally conceived.  When the doctor’s office called and moved up my first appointment after my initial lab, I knew something was wrong.  I put it out of my mind and headed off to the doctor’s office by myself.  (My husband had a previously scheduled meeting that he could not reschedule.)  As I got closer to her office, I started having a sick feeling in my stomach.

My doctor came in and asked some questions.  She said that she wanted to go ahead and do an ultrasound because I had had so many problems conceiving.  I kept telling myself that everything was fine.  The ultrasound technician asked more questions as she did the ultrasound and then asked if the doctor wanted to see me again.  She went to get my doctor.  They came back in and my doctor took my hand and told me that there was no heartbeat.  I was 11 weeks along.  I had waited for this baby for two years and now my baby was dead.  She was wrong, I told her, and we needed to wait and see.

She sent me home to decide on when to do the D&C.  My husband and I were devastated and cancelled our Thanksgiving plans.  He notified our family.  Later that evening, my sister-in-law called and told me about her previous miscarriage.  This helped more than anything.  Talking with someone that has experienced the same thing helps so much.

Going Through the Week in a Blur

The next morning, Thanksgiving Day, I woke up having cramps (contractions).  I knew that was not a good sign.  I tried to fix dinner for the two of us and that is when I miscarried.  We followed the doctor’s instructions.  I do not remember the rest of the day; the rest of the week was a blur.  I tried to do normal things like work and church but that made it worse.  Everyone had good intentions, but if you have never experienced this type of loss, sometimes it is better for others to say nothing.

So many people told me, “Oh, you’ll have another one.”  But I had waited for two years.  I did not want another one, I wanted that one.   We had tried for two years, and now this.  Or, “It happens more than you think.”  Just because it happens to others did not change my pain.  I knew other people go through this, but I was the one going through this now.  My favorite was, “Well you have another child.”  I did not!  She had me confused with my sister!  Like that would make a difference anyway.  One child is not a substitute for one that has been lost.  I know they meant well but these are NOT things to say to someone who just lost their baby.

Empathy Through Tragedy

I learned so much from this tragedy in my life.  It gave me an empathy that I had not had before.  Now, when I find out someone has miscarried, I say, “I’m sorry.  I know what you are going through.  I’ve been through it.  If you need to talk, I’m here,” then I give her a hug.

Remember the husband; he is grieving, too.  Give him a hug.  It is just as difficult for him as it is for his wife.  Too often, the men get overlooked.  They not only just lost a baby but they feel like they must be strong for their wives.  My husband tried so hard to protect me.  He hated seeing me so upset.

If the woman miscarried at home (not through D&C), she has physically gone through labor.  Many people do not realize this.  I had contractions and went through the entire birthing process.  It was not as intense as a full-term pregnancy, but it was the entire process, nonetheless.  This is still what haunts me.

Some people do not realize that a baby has been lost.

Even some people who are pro-life look at miscarriages as an illness and not a loss.  Miscarriages are not looked at as a death by most.  It is!  Just because we do not get to physically hold our babies does not make them any less real. There is no funeral to help say goodbye and have closure.  We have experienced a loss.  We must grieve.  I tried to ignore what had happened.  That just led to more problems later.  I encourage you to join a support group or seek grief counseling if you have been through this.  I waited over ten years before dealing with it.  This only compounded my other issues of grief.  It was only through grief counseling after the loss of my grandfather, that I realized I had not dealt with the grief of my miscarriage.

My miscarriage still affects me.  I wonder about the child that might have been.  Was it a boy or girl?   Would he be in college?  What would she look like? And, so many other questions.  What I do know is that I will someday see my precious baby in Heaven.  I also know that God has since given me three wonderful children.  I love them more than I ever thought I could.

We all deal with loss in different ways.

Some want to commemorate the loss and appreciate when a friend remembers with them.  For some, it is a private matter that they want to remember alone and move on.  For others still, it is a combination of things.  If you know someone that has had a miscarriage, just ask them if you can do something.  They will let you know where the boundaries are.  I do not mind talking about it, but be prepared for me to cry.  Do not let the tears make you uncomfortable.  Sometimes all we need is a hug and the knowledge that you are there.

If you have experienced a loss, please share your thoughts, experience or how others helped you?

You may also commemorate and honor your child here.

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